Speech from the Throne, what to expect

The Governor General will deliver the speech from the Throne today in the Senate outlining the government agenda for the 3rd session of the 40th Parliament.

The main focus of the throne speech will be the economy, jobs and growth. Out of the 6,000 word throne speech, the entire first half will focus on what the government has done with respect to the economy and what it plans to do moving forward. This economic agenda section of the throne speech will be split into three parts:

  • the government’s move into completing phase II of the economic action plan, including what the government has done to respond to the global economic crisis. Will also focus on government’s perceived strength among Canadians in building infrastructure and will outline plan for longer term infrastructure (including skills investment and R&D)

  • plan for recovery phase, deficit reduction and fiscal balance. Key themes will include winding down stimulus as economy recovers, restraining federal spending overall and protecting provincial transfers that protect Canadians (including healthcare transfers — government will emphasize that they will not balance budget by cutting healthcare transfers)
  • ensure the continued growth of the Canadian economy. The government will recognize that the private sector has to grow and continue to grow. Government will outline longterm plan for economic growth (including investments listed above). Government seeks to outline a key difference between it and the opposition whereas it seeks to help, not hurt, the private sector. The government will want to contrast itself with Liberals who have said that they would raise taxes and spend on huge projects including national daycare and highspeed rail. Economy remains a top priority of Canadians and the government’s throne speech will reflect a plan to address those concerns.

The second half of the throne speech will focus on the rest of government priorities which are not primarily focused on the economy and jobs.

The three sections of the second half will be “Making Canada the best place for families”, “Standing up for those who helped build Canada”, and “Strengthening a united Canada in a changing world”.

The families section will focus on the government’s plan to make sure that families live in a safe and secure country. Sub-themes include the classic tough-on-crime agenda and making communities safe. On a broader level, this includes national security.

The second section on standing up for those that helped build Canada will address seniors, aboriginals, veterans and will re-emphasize end to combat mission in Afghanistan in 2011 looking forward to a long term plan of reconstruction efforts.

Strengthening a united Canada in a changing world will address the environment, northern sovereignty, foreign affairs, immigration and refugee reform and democratic reform.

The throne speech will provide a broad outline of the government’s plan for the next session of Parliament while the budget will fill in the details.

Comments

comments

  • http://canadiansense.blogspot.com/ Canadiansense

    Could this lengthy speech be the election platform Preamble?

  • tedbetts

    “Out of the 6,000 word throne speech, the entire first half will focus on what the government has done with respect to the economy and what it plans to do moving forward.”

    3,000 words of bragging? They needed 3 months off to come up with “we've been doing a good job for you”? Is that what a Throne Speech is supposed to be about? Isn't that what they've been spending nearly $100 million of our tax dollars telling us already with the EAP ads every 30 seconds?

  • tedbetts

    Haven't had the full chance to read this myself yet so thank you for your summary (especially noting that they spent half their time bragging about themselves).

    But their economic platform/plan seems really at odds, speaking out of both sides of their mouths. Not that that is atypical of Harper but he's had 3 months off to get this right so I'm surprised.

    On the one hand, they “will outline plan for longer term infrastructure (including skills investment and R&D)” (a complaint the Liberals had of the EAP).

    But on the other hand, they will be “winding down stimulus as economy recovers, restraining federal spending overall and protecting provincial transfers that protect Canadians (including healthcare transfers” and “will outline longterm plan for economic growth (including investments listed above)”.

    These two positions are at odds. You can't plan to increase spending and restrain spending at the same time. And you certainly can't do that and say you are planning to pay down the deficit.

    Another sad day for fiscal conservatives under the Harper regime, including me, after reading this.

  • tedbetts

    Haven't had the full chance to read this myself yet so thank you for your summary (especially noting that they spent half their time bragging about themselves).

    But their economic platform/plan seems really at odds, speaking out of both sides of their mouths. Not that that is atypical of Harper but he's had 3 months off to get this right so I'm surprised.

    On the one hand, they “will outline plan for longer term infrastructure (including skills investment and R&D)” (a complaint the Liberals had of the EAP).

    But on the other hand, they will be “winding down stimulus as economy recovers, restraining federal spending overall and protecting provincial transfers that protect Canadians (including healthcare transfers” and “will outline longterm plan for economic growth (including investments listed above)”.

    These two positions are at odds. You can't plan to increase spending and restrain spending at the same time. And you certainly can't do that and say you are planning to pay down the deficit.

    Another sad day for fiscal conservatives under the Harper regime, including me, after reading this.

  • Mary T

    And of course we have iggy saying this was not worth proroguing the HofC. And what did iggy do during the 17 extra days of holidays. My bet, all three amigos will support this speech.

  • Mary T

    Where do you get 3 months, it was 17 days of extra holidays for iggy. As the House wasn't scheduled to get back till Jan 25, then a break for the Olympics. Too bad libs/media/ndp and others can't count.

  • Phil

    The Best: Reducing environmental and ownership regulations.
    The Worst: Trying to change the national anthem for PC reasons.
    The Rest: Bland as dry bread.

  • Bec

    Call me a sucker for patriotism but I found the speech, refreshingly optimistic and consistently stuck to a patriotic theme. I sense we need that as the Liberals have messed up this country through the decades of pandering and ignoring entire regions.
    I enjoyed the upbeat theme and fully support the direction.

    As far as the National Anthem goes, it's a panel to study whether or not to return to the original wording, that's it.
    An interesting premise and beyond the Olympics, may reacquaint Canadians with the fact that they are Canadians first and should perhaps take the time to learn it.
    I found the whole idea intriguing.

  • tedbetts

    Oh, MaryT, still on this?

    Parliament has not sat since December 11. Which means Harper has been freed up from the “distractions” (as Kenney put it) of QP to “re-calibrate” for 83 days in preparation for this moment.

    Surely you are not claiming that, in that 83 day break, the only prep time Harper used was the 22 days that Parliament might otherwise have been sitting, are you?

  • tedbetts

    Don't read the news much, eh, Mary?

  • tedbetts

    Actually, the change to the anthem is going back to original language so even I would give him a pass here.

  • Mary T

    The Christmas break was submitted to the Speaker in Sept, and was agreed on by all parties, so all of them planned to be on holiday on Dec 11-Jan 25. Remember, Layton went snorkeling, iggy went home to France, Goodale went to Arizona. Not one of them cried that the holiday should be shortened. And they all agreed to recess for the Olympics. So, it was only 17 days extra of no QP.

  • Mary T

    What has that got to do with the probablility that all 3 amigos will support this. Hey, did you catch the last comment made to Goodale today, pre speech, when the cbc gal said, hey Ralph, sometimes it takes 3 to tango.

  • tedbetts

    So are you saying that Harper didn't work between December 11 and March 3? Because he is claiming that he spent all that time working and that he needed the super long time off to “re-calibrate”. Whether or not there was 22 fewer days of QP, there was 83 days of prep time for this Throne Speech. It is not as if Harper only thinks and plans on QP days. Puhlease. Those 61 days didn't just get prorogued right off of the calendar, Mary.

  • gbillg

    Ugh..Throne Speeches. Cant wait for ____________ of the Liberals to call this a “do nothing” budget, and, ____________ of the NDP to say this budget is an attack on women and children, and of course, ______________ of the Conservatives to say this budget hits home with all Canadians.
    And I get all tingley thinking about the 3 panel unbiased journalists who on CBC will attempt to sound like they've poured over the document and have an acutal clue as to what any of it means. From watching Canadian Olympians compete to Throne Speeches…. cripes…. billg

  • tedbetts

    Ignatieff has already said he will support the throne speech since there is nothing new in it – other than Seniors Day and Vimy Ridge Day – and he supported all of these measures the first time Harper introduced them.

    My comment about you not reading much has to do with your question about what Ignatieff was doing during the extended Harper Holiday.

  • http://canadiansense.blogspot.com/ Canadiansense

    Ted,

    Why are Liberals so unhappy? Parliamentary Supremacy stunt failed (Point of Order)?

    Why do you think the Liberals keep “propping up” the government with all the negative comments?

    A) Jack is more popular and would be the coalition leader?
    B) Finances of Liberals still not in good shape?
    C) Nancy Charest is typical of the Liberals in Quebec who believe the Party in Toronto is unable to win and help Quebec?
    D) Instead of real ideas, the party of props & stunts need to talk about days off to avoid any hint of adult conversation.

    Never mind, we both know how difficult it is to accept the FB stunt led by the NDP blew up in your face.

  • bluetech

    This is a huge disapointment:

    “The Copenhagen Accord reflects these principles and is fully supported by the Government of Canada. Together with other industrialized countries, Canada will provide funding to help developing economies reduce their emissions and adapt to climate change….”

  • Ian in NS

    For those of us under, what, 100 years old? “In all they sons” *is* original language, plus I don’t think “thou dost in us” rolls off the tongue very well. I’m with Phil; this is PC crap masquerading as historic reversion.

  • batb

    The photo is from another throne speech. Sorry! I noticed the GG's frizzy hairdo pulled back from her forehead in the most recent speech and wondered why she was looking so “informal.” She looked like she'd just got out of the shower and hadn't had time to do her hair.

  • batb

    The photo is from another throne speech. Sorry! I noticed the GG's frizzy hairdo pulled back from her forehead in the most recent speech and wondered why she was looking so “informal.” She looked like she'd just got out of the shower and hadn't had time to do her hair.