Omar Khadr questions for Jack Layton, Stephen Harper and Michael Ignatieff

Mr. Layton, now that Omar Khadr is a convicted and sentenced murderer, do you believe that a future Canadian government will owe an official apology to him? And since you’re running to be Prime Minister, will you take the initiative to do so should you lead a future government?

Mr. Harper, your government acted in concert with opposition parties to expedite legislative reform on pardons earlier this year. Given Khadr’s sentence and reported plea deal, what is your government going to do on judicial reform to delay his repatriation? What was your government’s role (if any) in the plea negotiation? If the government had a role, what were its objectives and how probable was an alternative less desirable outcome?

Mr. Ignatieff, which is the travesty of justice in your view? The detention, trial, conviction and incarceration of Omar Khadr? Or that Omar Khadr will only serve what is projected by some to be two years of a 40 year sentence for murder that was handed down by a jury in a US military tribunal today?

UPDATE: The NDP’s justice critic Joe Comartin is on the record regarding his party’s position (pre-conviction and sentencing),

“The thing they should do is (give him) a whole chunk of money, much as they had to (with) Maher Arar, because there is nobody who believes Omar Khadr has any chance of being acquitted in a military tribunal and he will probably be sentenced to a lengthy period of time inprison in the U.S.,” he said. “They could compensate him for all those years that he is going to lose.”

Comments

comments

  • Liz J

    First off, what did Canada do to Omar Khadr?

    Who was responsible for his being in Afghanistan fighting against his own country and our allies?

    No doubt the Liberal/Left will continue to say he was a “child soldier” which he was not. He was not in an army he was closer to a roving terrorist. He was over the age of 14 years and fighting for the enemy, the same lot who are responsible for the scourge of our time, the same lot who our troops are fighting and being blown up by with their cowardly use of roadside bombs.

    Why did the Liberal governments of Chretien and Martin and the MSM choose to ignore the convicted killer for over two years until the Conservative government came to power?

    Why should Canada interfere with the Justice system of our neighbor and ally whose citizen he killed?

    Do the Liberal/Left, the likes of Comartin et al, really think we should reward a punk killer by forking over millions of our dollars for killing a US medic in the battlefield? That’s what it amounts to.

    Shame on the whole lot of them and I would also include Romeo Dallaire who still insists Khadr was a “child soldier”, I can only conclude he has to be playing politics because he has to know better.

  • Rob C

    A question for Mr. Harper.
    Having plead guilty to various terrorist activities , will Khadr be charged with treason as he took up arms against Canada and our allies??

  • batb

    Romeo D’Allaire is definitely playing politics, Liz. I had the misfortune of being at an event a few years ago (free tickets) where D’Allaire was the keynote speaker.

    I was expecting a condemnation of the UN and their ineffectiveness in the war theatre, especially in Rwanda, where D’Allaire had played such a key role. I couldn’t believe my ears. He was singing the praises of the UN.

    It was like I was hearing a victim of Stockholm Syndrome. I walked away from that evening quite disillusioned, wondering what it would take for someone who had been through his experience to face up to the enormity of what he’d been through and admit what the reasons were for the tragic fiasco. As it was, he was making quite a name for himself, not to mention a living, from supporting the UN’s view of things.

  • Bec

    Treason!
    The UN supported the movement of the allied countries into Afghanistan. This wee terrorist WAS NOT a Canadian when he took up arms against members of those allied forces.

    Plain and simple, he committed treason.

    He can’t be both. He can’t be a ‘child SOLDIER’ of the Al Qaeda and a Canadian. He is either one or the other. He took up arms against US by killing one of US.

    The position of the Coalition leaders just disgusts me and if this wee terrorist gets a penny, there will be an uprising in this country that has never been seen before. This country has given this family more than they deserve already and they have done nothing but spit in our face with their choices and behaviour.
    Perhaps without a husband and father, the woman could have seen how well they did on their own in Afghanistan. Now THAT would have been worth paying for…..

  • Oldweesie

    Gee. I guess I should be a New Democrat. Crime pays.

  • Alberta Bob

    traitors should be hanged

  • wilson

    Well, they de-program terrorists in Saudi, there are no such facilities in Canada,
    so off to camp for little Khadr, hop on the first UAE flight out.

    Chretien was in charge when Arar was ‘tortured’…$$$$$
    Chretien was in charge when little Khadr was ‘tortured’,
    tho those torture grounds were tossed out by the US judge,
    Cdn court says little Khadr’s rights were violated,
    while Chretien was in charge.

  • gimbol

    One question I’ll ask anyone who wants to use the “child-soldier” defence for Omar is this:

    Who was he fighting for?

  • Liz J

    The Khadr kid will soon be coming back to his safe haven to claim he was tortured by his “captors” who happen to be our biggest ally and neighbour.

    Next step will be to accuse Canada of allowing the US to keep him in custody for killing one of their men in uniform while he was attending to wounded on the battlefield.

    Next step, with the help of free lawyers, provided by the people of Canada, sue us for million$.

    Who will represent us in all of this? Who will ask the burning questions pertinent to his case?

    As a Canadian born, Canadian citizen who has been labeled by the Lib/Left as a child soldier,why was he soldiering for the enemy? When you fight for the enemy of your country you are at the very least a traitor, and no matter how it’s sliced by the manipulators of the law, it’s a treasonous act.

    Calling him a child soldier was the beginning of the excuses to get him off and pay him big money.
    Canada did not make him a “child soldier”, never mind the little detail, a child soldier is one under 14. Canada did not know what the Khadrs were up to, allegedly training their offspring to be terrorists, using Canada as a safe haven. Chretien apparently did not know either, he worked to spring the Khadr sire from Pakistan custody, there were pictures of visiting him in a hospital there. The Liberals dropped that one like a hot potato when the Khadrs started to be exposed, they ignored the little fella when he was sent to Gitmo but now, with the Conservatives in power, it’s urgent that we bring Khadr home to join the ranks of the unemployable. Who would hire him/them?

    Like all other unfinished and unpopular tasks the Liberals ignored, the Conservative will now have to deal with the maneuvers of the legal system in this case and we will pay up for not rescuing him from the big bad USA.

    Are we not in effect playing to the enemy? Are they not laughing at us?

  • Anonymous

    …Or that Omar Khadr will only serve what is projected by some to be two years of a 40 year sentence for murder?

    Having trouble with math? Khadr has spent 8 years incarcerated already. 8 + 2 = 10. And I don’t seriously expect that he’ll be paroled in 2 years; do you?

    I don’t know what exactly to make of the Khadr guilty pleas. I can of course say that after 8 years of incarceration in an extra-legal gulag, he is a cynical, broken young man, with just enough sense to realize that by pleading guilty, he’ll minimize the inevitable sentence from the military kangaroo court.

    But I don’t need to, to make the real points of this situation. So, for sake of argument, let’s assume he is what he says he is – pro-Taliban, against the invasion of Afghanistan, and guilty of throwing that grenade.

    That still leaves:
    – disregard of his status as a child combatant at the time of capture
    – this was a war, Afghanistan was invaded, he chose to defend his country of birth, Geneva convention applies, he was an enemy combatant. His actions are no more murder than that of NATO soldiers shooting Afghans.
    – 8 years of imprisonment in an extra-legal jurisdiction that has been condemned by the world. 8 years! No Nazis languished that long in prison without a trial.
    – a made-up military “court” system
    – Canada’s failure to press for legal and ethical treatment of a Canadian national.

    There are NOT two sets of laws – one for who we think are guilty, and another for who we think are innocent. Either we are ruled by law, or we aren’t. Either we uphold the principles we profess to believe in, or we show ourselves to be hypocrites when we drop them to suit the mood.

    If we cannot deal with the Khadrs in our midst without violating our own principles, we have no business criticizing the heavy-handed actions of China, Myanmar, Cuba, Iran and other countries that we claim to be morally superior to. Do as you would be done by.

  • Anonymous

    the only coalition citizen captured by Americans not repatriated as far as I know

    Correct.

    If nothing else, it was a war, he was a combatant and Geneva convention should have applied.

  • Anonymous

    We either have principles, or we don’t. Laws and principles aren’t like your favourite jacket that you only wear on Fridays.