Latest Haiti relief information from Ottawa

According to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and other sources:

The geology
– 7.3 magnitude quake at 16:53:09 on January 12th, 2010
– epicentre of quake, 15km from Port-au-Prince, 10km depth
– at least 12 aftershocks between 5.0-5.9 magnitude since
– first earthquake of this magnitude to hit Hispaniola since 1751

The numbers
– RCMP Sergeant Mark Gallagher among dead. Was on UN Peacekeeping mission.
– including Gallagher, four Canadians are confirmed dead
– 13 Canadians injured
– 550 Canadians have been located
1415 Canadians are missing
– between 50,000-100,000 Haitians dead
– one third of Haitian population (3 million) affected by quake
Catastrophic infrastructure damage in Port-au-Prince (satellite image for Google Earth)

The evacuation
– First wave of Canadian wave of evacuees landed in Montreal last night
– CF flights have evacuated 272 Canadians
– Three Canadian flights into Port-au-Prince

Deployed support and facilitation of foreign deployment
HMCS Athabaskan and HMCS Halifax en route to Haiti. Includes equipment and helicopters.
– Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Jason Kenney has exempted foreign nationals on non-commercial aircraft from obtained temporary visas if they are on their way to provide relief to Haiti
Canada has been refueling stop for Russian and Chinese aircraft en route to Haiti
– CF operation dubbed HESTIA

Financial Aid
– CIDA Minister Bev Oda has set up Haiti relief fund to match Canadian donations up to $50 million
– Ontario government has contributed $1 million to Haiti earthquake relief
– British Columbian government has contributed $500,000
– CRA warns donors to be informed of charities
– Staff fundraiser to be held on Parliament Hill for Haiti relief effort on January 25th at 6pm. Contact achristiano@summa.ca for details.

Canadian Reporters on the scene with Twitter
@smithjoanna (TorStar)
@jorgebarrera (Canwest)
@Stephen_Maher__ (Chronicle Herald)
@perreaux (Globe and Mail)
@althiaraj (Sun Media)
– My twitter list of reporters reporting on the Haiti relief effort (on the ground or en route)

Comments

comments

  • Ronald

    Truly remarkable feat undertaken by Canada at very short notice.
    Don't let this become a political football in the end for partisan points.
    Although it's already happened perhaps we can keep it down to a dull roar
    Spending a lot of time channel hopping, I noticed only two (derogitory remarks. One by Dosanjh and the other by Ralph Goodale. Both are on tape, (CBC) so it's not hard to see the exact terminology they used.
    How small can you get?

  • Joshua

    Why not sub contract work out to construction,telecom,and rcmp specialists to help,train Haitians themselves so they rebuild their country.Now is good time to get infratructure built up to code.Built by Haitians for Haitians.Let the cost be absorbed by the UN world community as a whole.

    Joshua

  • kenn2

    Prior to the earthquake, there were exactly those efforts going on. Problem is that Haiti is a country with very few resources, and an undereducated workforce, so there is very little to sustain a functioning national economy. So progress was slow, but by some accounts Haiti had been making progress.

    Then comes this earthquake, and they are now starting again from zero. Or less than zero maybe.

    The immediate requirement right now is simply to get food, water and medical treatment to the survivors. Next is temporary shelter and basic sanitation.

    I don't expect a serious rebuilding effort to get underway for months, and alot of discussions will be required over the nature of reconstruction (same unsafe buildings and shanties, or to code) and how it will be funded and executed.

  • batb

    It sure looks like the Haitians are going to have to go back to the drawing board.

    Look at the number of relief agencies, first, they had in their country just to provide the basic amenities. The Haitian government wasn't providing health care, housing, road maintenance, water, etc., etc. Now, look at the number of agencies — and the years and years — it's going to take to just clean up the overwhelming mess after the earthquake, let alone to rebuild. Maybe I shouldn't even refer to “rebuilding,” seeing as that would assume an infrastructure on which to rebuild. There is no infrastructure.

    Haiti is a hell hole, and has been for years. One hopes that perhaps after this monumental disaster, which has revealed the utter corruption and inadequacy of the government (if that was necessary), there will be an opportunity, as Joshua suggests, to build a city up to standard requirements by Haitians for Haitians. Let's leave the UN out of the equation, as they have their own problems with corruption.

    It will be very difficult — I'm not saying impossible — for the people to shake off the culture of corruption and intertia, but if they don't and if they can't find a way with international help to move forward and to begin to work on their own behalf for a better standard of living, all the help they get now will be of little use to them.

    Earthquakes kill. So does corruption.

  • batb

    It sure looks like the Haitians are going to have to go back to the drawing board.

    Look at the number of relief agencies, first, they had in their country just to provide the basic amenities. The Haitian government wasn't providing health care, housing, road maintenance, water, etc., etc. Now, look at the number of agencies — and the years and years — it's going to take to just clean up the overwhelming mess after the earthquake, let alone to rebuild. Maybe I shouldn't even refer to “rebuilding,” seeing as that would assume an infrastructure on which to rebuild. There is no infrastructure.

    Haiti is a hell hole, and has been for years. One hopes that perhaps after this monumental disaster, which has revealed the utter corruption and inadequacy of the government (if that was necessary), there will be an opportunity, as Joshua suggests, to build a city up to standard requirements by Haitians for Haitians. Let's leave the UN out of the equation, as they have their own problems with corruption.

    It will be very difficult — I'm not saying impossible — for the people to shake off the culture of corruption and intertia, but if they don't and if they can't find a way with international help to move forward and to begin to work on their own behalf for a better standard of living, all the help they get now will be of little use to them.

    Earthquakes kill. So does corruption.