Dion was an unexpected gift, but Ignatieff was an original Tory prospect

During the Liberal convention in December of 2006, Bob Rae was seen by Conservative strategists as the most fearful prospect that the Liberals had on offer to their delegates. Most messaging that came from the Conservative camp during this time was against Rae and the party did its best to suggest to Liberal delegates that he would deliver economic disaster to Canada like he did for Ontario. The Tories did their best political maneuvering to spike Rae’s bid because focus testing showed that enough time had passed between the sour days of Bob Rae the NDP Premier and the “give-him-a-chance” Bob Rae Liberal leadership candidate. Dedicated Ontario political watchers would remember tough economic times under Rae but apparently the modern dynamic had changed for the typical voter. “He has the chance to be a Canadian Bill Clinton” was how I heard the smooth talking and charming candidate described by a particularly concerned senior Conservative.

Yet, times have changed again and the economic recession is now centre-stage and it doesn’t take a surplus of political sense to acknowledge that a Rae leadership win would have been trouble for the Liberals in the 2006 leadership race, and that in 2009 — if it had occurred. During the 2006 race, as the front-runner, the Conservatives had already constructed a thorough game plan against Ignatieff and believe they had a workable strategy against the American-tenured academic should he become leader of Canada’s natural ruling party. “Ignatieff is awkward and tends to put his foot in his mouth a lot” was the consensus among senior Tory partisans. My sense was that during the 2006 leadership race, while Conservatives were concerned about Rae, they were less so about Ignatieff. And then Dion happened and he became a surprise, a wonderful gift and an unexpected best case scenario for the Conservatives and their Prime Minister.

Today, Michael Ignatieff is the leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and he’s starting to show strong gaffe potential, a lack of clear policy direction and a generally aloof attitude towards the Canadian electorate. In fairness, I’d say that Ignatieff is much more calm and calculated that his hapless predecessor and instead, we find him focused on the long game. This should help Liberal prospects. Yet, Ignatieff is failing along the predicted lines of the original Conservative assessment. Yesterday, in Cambridge, the good professor mused that “we will have to raise taxes”. As a front-runner-turned-crowned-leader of the Liberal Party, Ignatieff never needed to wedge and never needed to segment in order to differentiate his campaign. It is unclear as to why in a trajectory largely devoid of policy pronouncements that of the rare policy musings he is making, he is offering ideas that are generally seen as unpopular. For example, in an interview with CityTV’s Richard Madan last December, the Liberal leader mused that he’s open to reversing the Conservative’s 2% GST cut.

Few election campaigns have seen bold policy stands by leaders fail so spectacularly. Despite this, we recently saw how the idea of funding non-Catholic faith-based religious schools sunk the PC Party’s prospects during the last Ontario election and for the Liberal Party of Canada, the carbon tax was a federal electoral disaster in 2008. Though Mr. Dion will be scapegoated with the carbon tax and conveniently shelved away, the Liberals will be considering the policy again at their next convention. Though in truth, Mr. Ignatieff was the original proponent of the tax.

Now it seems that Mr. Ignatieff is against such a tax but how can we be so sure given his reversal on this policy that his membership is now proposing? For Mr. Ignatieff, whether we’re taxed on carbon, income, or our purchases, what he’s made clear is that under his leadership our taxes would go up. Though cliché, this paraphrased statement holds:

“A carbon tax if necessary, but not necessarily a carbon tax.”

or rather, “a tax is necessary, but not necessarily a carbon tax.”

Mr. Rae would have been a wonderful leader for the Conservatives to oppose, unelectable as he would have been though disastrous for Canadians should have assumed residency at 24 Sussex Drive. Mr. Dion would have raised our taxes with a carbon tax. With Mr. Ignatieff, we know that while times are tough, he’d heap on increased government burden. At least with Mr. Dion, we would have known where it was coming from and how to brace ourselves. Terrible Liberal fiscal policy makes for good Conservative electoral prospects. Terrible and ambiguous Liberal fiscal policy makes for great Conservative electoral prospects.

Conservatives are looking forward to a Liberal party led by the professor on loan from Massachusetts. They’re anticipating the Canadian reaction of watching Mr. Ignatieff debate himself on how to best raise our taxes.

Comments

comments

  • http://www.wernerpatels.com Werner Patels

    I share most of your views on the subjects you covered here, but all your predictions assume one crucial key element: an electorate from coast to coast that is actually capable of common sense, and that's exactly what we don't have in this country, with the number of common-sense thinkers dwindling every day.

    Let's not forget that so many Torontonians, for example, positively love being taxed to death. If a national leader like Iggy says he'll raise taxes, they'll probably kiss his feet and build him a statue.

    We're not dealing with intelligent, educated people capable of common sense in this country.

  • http://www.bluelikeyou.com/ Joanne (T.B.)

    Well done, Stephen. The Liberals still haven't taken the time to do some introspective analysis.

    They continue to focus on how to get back into power, rather than approaching it the old-fashioned way: Put out good policies and give the voters a chance to hear your ideas.

    Iggy's approach is to tell Canadians whatever they want to hear based on the time zone he happens to be in.

    But I disagree with Werner. I think Canadians are becoming much more aware of how politicians can affect their wallets, and I believe they will vote accordingly. (O.K. Maybe not in Toronto.)

  • Ted

    So you think the government should never ever consider raising taxes under any circumstance?

    Ignatieff absolutely did not say he would raise taxes. He clearly said that in order to eliminate the deficit after the recession it may be necessary to do that. Otherwise, we leave a hell of a mess for our kids. He said it would be irresponsible to take a tax increase off of the table of options for fixing Harper's fiscal mess. And he is right.

    Moreover, how is this even a gaffe? If he did not mean to say it, then it would be a gaffe, but he has said in January and he said it earlier this week and he said it again yesterday.

    It's called honesty. After 3 years of Harper and 2 of Martin and well, when have we ever had true honesty from our politicians. When Harper can lie about income trusts and Cadman and unelected senators, and McGuinty can lie about no tax increases, all with impunity and getting re-elected, the lesson seems to be to go ahead and lie.

    Ignatieff won't do that.

  • Michael Read

    Should it be a surprise that someone whose spent a few years in Boston among the Kennedy-Kerry set would be for something before he was against it?

  • http://www.christianconservative.ca Christian Conservative

    Yes, Toronto does love to be taxed, hence David Miller's mayoralty. However, that's actaully something we've got going for us… THERE'S NO MORE SEATS IN TORONTO FOR THE LIBERALS TO WIN.

  • Alex

    Great post Stephen. As an aside, I thought at first glance your post was going to be about how the Conservatives tried to recruit into the party or something like that (“Original Tory Prospect”). Not enough coffee…

  • Observant

    I'm curious as to how the Liberal backroom braintrust will sell 'we Americans' Ignatieff to Canadians in any next election expected this Fall (because Iggy can't run on the same abstention treadmill that destroyed Dion).

    How will they market Ignatieff who was MIA for 30 years while true Canadians were in the trenches saving Canada from the Quebec separatists and the American 'bastards' … and now returning to Canada as a conquering hero and saviour of the nation from the Conservative hordes?!

    Would Canadians put their trust in somebody who only returned to Canada to become our prime minister, and has only live and worked (if you call being an MP “work”) in Canada full time for only 4 years? Seems rather incredulous to me …..

  • Jon Evan

    I think that raising taxes in good times is sellable: filling gov't coffers to act as a safety net for the vulnerable or to pay down the debt makes sense to most of us. But, that's the problem. We are not in good times but in a recession and we may be there for a very long time and raising taxes during a recession is dumb. As everyone knows the world's economy is so tied up with the USA. That country is bankrupt I'm afraid to say. I predict that there will not be good times for a long time. We won't have to worry about Mr. Ignatieff raising taxes. And changing gov't in bad times will only lead to another minority gov't: hardly a useful thing for Mr. Ignatieff!

  • gimbol

    So Iggy proposes that taxes be raised but not how and where, and like the liberals tried with the carbon tax, will try to convince the voters in different regions of the country that “someone else” will have to pay it.

    Iggy thinks out loud too much for his own good.
    I sense there is more than a few blue-liberals rethinking their opinion of Iggy right now.

    BTW
    How long till the lib convention? 2 weeks or so?
    Two weeks can be an eternity in politics.

  • Nick

    Werner, while I understand your outrage towards Torontonians, I think painting the city with such a broad stroke neglects the droves of non-traditional voters that the Conservatives have access to in the city. Also, I feel that you’re confusing a lack of “common sense” with an opposition towards your own personal political leanings. I think if we can take anything away from the Conservative’s reign as a minority government, its that there is no “common” sense in politics, but rather an informed and uninformed citizenry that holds various views on many issues, all of which must be heard and understood. Only from this point is a political party able to properly govern a nation.

  • Nick

    Werner, while I understand your outrage towards Torontonians, I think painting the city with such a broad stroke neglects the droves of non-traditional voters that the Conservatives have access to in the city. Also, I feel that you’re confusing a lack of “common sense” with an opposition towards your own personal political leanings. I think if we can take anything away from the Conservative’s reign as a minority government, its that there is no “common” sense in politics, but rather an informed and uninformed citizenry that holds various views on many issues, all of which must be heard and understood. Only from this point is a political party able to properly govern a nation.

  • Observant

    Consider these Canadian political scenarios after the next election most likely this Fall:

    Scenario ‘A’ — Nothing much changes and Harper still has a minority government. Ignatieff, Layton and Duceppe would most likely resurrect their coalition junta, bring down Harper on a no confidence vote, and then demand the GG install a Liberal Ignatieff-NDP Layton minority government, to which she will accede.

    Scenario ‘B’ — Liberals win a minority government and arrange an accord with the NDP and possibly with the BQ for a secure 18-24 month reign that is highly beneficial for the East.

    I seriously doubt Canada will see a majority government within the near future based on the political divisions with the provinces and big cities. I see Canada descending into a deep political malaise because Canadians are political peasants unable to understand the global forces that are enveloping Canada and requiring a strong majority government to steer the ship of state through the coming turmoil.

    If the Ignatieff Liberals manage to seize power through their Toronto-Montreal-Maritime base, I fear Canada may be torn apart because the West may not tolerate the tyranny of the Eastern majority. When Canadians are called upon to vote again most likely this Fall, I hope they understand that the unity of the country is at stake … and that unity will not be preserved with an Ignatieff Liberal government.

  • Observant

    Consider these Canadian political scenarios after the next election most likely this Fall:

    Scenario ‘A’ — Nothing much changes and Harper still has a minority government. Ignatieff, Layton and Duceppe would most likely resurrect their coalition junta, bring down Harper on a no confidence vote, and then demand the GG install a Liberal Ignatieff-NDP Layton minority government, to which she will accede.

    Scenario ‘B’ — Liberals win a minority government and arrange an accord with the NDP and possibly with the BQ for a secure 18-24 month reign that is highly beneficial for the East.

    I seriously doubt Canada will see a majority government within the near future based on the political divisions with the provinces and big cities. I see Canada descending into a deep political malaise because Canadians are political peasants unable to understand the global forces that are enveloping Canada and requiring a strong majority government to steer the ship of state through the coming turmoil.

    If the Ignatieff Liberals manage to seize power through their Toronto-Montreal-Maritime base, I fear Canada may be torn apart because the West may not tolerate the tyranny of the Eastern majority. When Canadians are called upon to vote again most likely this Fall, I hope they understand that the unity of the country is at stake … and that unity will not be preserved with an Ignatieff Liberal government.

  • terry1

    Ted, you are correct in your assessment. In fact he is showing there is a difference between him and Harper who has learned to say anything w/o recourse to facts. Harper has stated we can get out of the $80BB deficits(so far) we are going to see from his reign w/o tax increases. Firstly, with Harper's penchent for seriously understating there was a recession to begin with I cannot believe there will only be an $80BB deficit over the next two years. This is simply more smoke and mirrors to cover off the disaster that GST tax cuts are to our fiscal health.

    Iggy has simply put out a marker and will wait for Harper to try and use it against him. That will give him the cover to unleash a barrage of facts about Harper's mismanagement of the economy. Telling the truth and telling it early will serve Iggy and the Liberals well and places him clearly in the middle of the spectrum as Layton thinks the current deficits are not nearly high enough for his socialist agenda.

    In any event Hasrper will not be around to face those facts. I believe he will be gone by summer either defeated in the house or he will resign. He cannot continue to run on the right and govern on the left. The Tories will never get a win again under him let alone a majority in the next election.

  • terry1

    Observant, funny thing about trust. Iggy's personal poll numbers. They clearly rival those of Harper and his are on the rise vs your guy's slow but sure decline to obscurity. I think the marketing plan will be about Harper's absence of good government along with iggy's world travels that made him the competent person he is.

    Iggy did not returen to Caanda to simply become PM. it was an obvious goal but he was recruited by the Libs as he had leadership written all over him. Had Paul Martin survived another term iggy would have then become the natural successor. Instead he is having to do it the hard way and that is proving he is up to the job. His fund raising success to date is something you should worry about. as he will be able to out hustle Harper with nasties if the next election goes that way.

  • Jack M

    Anybody else running into the idea that Iggy is another Cretin? I’ve had several people tell me that they will vote for Iggy because the minute he wins he will throw the little red election promise book and the left wing of the party under the bus and govern from the right fiscally.

  • Jack M

    Anybody else running into the idea that Iggy is another Cretin? I’ve had several people tell me that they will vote for Iggy because the minute he wins he will throw the little red election promise book and the left wing of the party under the bus and govern from the right fiscally.

  • Observant

    Good points, terry1 … so the next election expected for this Fall will be a PR contest and a full-fledged mud-slinging match (a la Kinsella) … all for the hearts, minds and votes of Canadians.

    Who will Canadians prefer? The guy who reduced taxes versus the guy who says he wants to increase taxes? The guy who has fought the good fight against separatists and living in Canada, or the guy who was absent for 30 years living in the UK and USA? The guy who earned his PM position the hard way working in the trenches or the guy who just shows up to be PM all within 4 years of service to the country?

    Will the Liberal backroom strategists be able to demonize Harper so much that Ignatieff will start to look good to Canadians? Will the Conservatives be blamed for the global recession and deficits while the Liberals will be remembered for reducing the Mulroney deficits (downloading it all on to the provinces)? Will Liberal strategy be to link Mulroney to Harper based on the current inquiry all to stain Conservatives with corruption?

    Do current polling numbers reflect dissatisfaction with Harper and preference for Ignatieff or do they reflect party preferences … or do they only reflect the opinions of urbanites in Toronto and Montreal? Will Canadians give Ignatieff credit for traveling the world and thus fully ‘competent’ to govern Canada moreso than Canadian-bound Harper? Will Canadians recognize that Ignatieff’s impressive academic record is superior to Harper’s sparse academic status?

    Will Canadians vote Liberal in any next election thus rewarding Ignatieff with the prime ministership by default? So many questions that will only be answered in an election expected this Fall when Ignatieff declares that the ‘probation’ is over and Canada needs a Liberal government to save Canada just like Chretien and Martin saved Canada after fully discredited Mulroney?

    Get the drift …….????

  • Observant

    Good points, terry1 … so the next election expected for this Fall will be a PR contest and a full-fledged mud-slinging match (a la Kinsella) … all for the hearts, minds and votes of Canadians.

    Who will Canadians prefer? The guy who reduced taxes versus the guy who says he wants to increase taxes? The guy who has fought the good fight against separatists and living in Canada, or the guy who was absent for 30 years living in the UK and USA? The guy who earned his PM position the hard way working in the trenches or the guy who just shows up to be PM all within 4 years of service to the country?

    Will the Liberal backroom strategists be able to demonize Harper so much that Ignatieff will start to look good to Canadians? Will the Conservatives be blamed for the global recession and deficits while the Liberals will be remembered for reducing the Mulroney deficits (downloading it all on to the provinces)? Will Liberal strategy be to link Mulroney to Harper based on the current inquiry all to stain Conservatives with corruption?

    Do current polling numbers reflect dissatisfaction with Harper and preference for Ignatieff or do they reflect party preferences … or do they only reflect the opinions of urbanites in Toronto and Montreal? Will Canadians give Ignatieff credit for traveling the world and thus fully ‘competent’ to govern Canada moreso than Canadian-bound Harper? Will Canadians recognize that Ignatieff’s impressive academic record is superior to Harper’s sparse academic status?

    Will Canadians vote Liberal in any next election thus rewarding Ignatieff with the prime ministership by default? So many questions that will only be answered in an election expected this Fall when Ignatieff declares that the ‘probation’ is over and Canada needs a Liberal government to save Canada just like Chretien and Martin saved Canada after fully discredited Mulroney?

    Get the drift …….????

  • MikeW

    Therre seem to be a lot of people who believe increasing taxes (all types – choose your poison) in or after a recession is essential to offset the incurred debt. What is necessary when – not if – we recover, and commodities will lead us out, is to improve productivity, contain Gov't expenditures to equal or less than Can. economic growth (GDP) and pop. growth. The stimulus spending in the Can. budget (unlike USA) is time limited and no new Gov't. departments or programmes will accrue.

  • Liz J

    IMO. Ignatieff is still digging a hole when he's already in over his head. He's not talking like someone who has some clue about what he's doing. Pretty bad when he's correcting himself by starting off in denial as to what he actually did say on tape. Shades of Jean Chretien when he replied to a question about scrapping the GST, he said “it's gone” . He got his majority, then lied again by saying he didn't say it but the video tape didn't lie. Sheila Copps believed him and promised the same, she was forced to run to get re-elected, not her boss though, he went on his merry way.

    Sadly, the Ontario voters appear to like fibbers, especially proven ones, they've given McGuinty back to back majorities after he broke every promise he made to get elected the first time around.

    Folks like Ted et al will have to forgive us if we're skeptical about Liberals who make promises. Sometimes changes have to be made during the course of a mandate through changes to circumstances, but outright lies are promises used to get elected knowing full well they can't possibly keep them.

  • Take Dead Aim

    Iggy is the most savy Liberal leader to come along in my lifetime.

    At the end of this recession, there will be the same public pressure to balance the budget, and it’ll be awfully hard to do with a 5% consumption tax, when so many pre-existing public expenditures were based on a 7% consumption tax..

    I’m a life-long Conservative, and if Iggy doesn’t concern you as a Conservative supporter than you’re as blind as life long Liberal suppoerts who thought Harper would never become prime minister.

    We wrote a Liberal budget out of fear. Before this is over we’ll have to wear it, and that gives smart Liberal strategists way to much freedom to maneuver.

  • Take Dead Aim

    Iggy is the most savy Liberal leader to come along in my lifetime.

    At the end of this recession, there will be the same public pressure to balance the budget, and it’ll be awfully hard to do with a 5% consumption tax, when so many pre-existing public expenditures were based on a 7% consumption tax..

    I’m a life-long Conservative, and if Iggy doesn’t concern you as a Conservative supporter than you’re as blind as life long Liberal suppoerts who thought Harper would never become prime minister.

    We wrote a Liberal budget out of fear. Before this is over we’ll have to wear it, and that gives smart Liberal strategists way to much freedom to maneuver.

  • terry1

    Hey Liz J….. how do you like this hole Iggy has dug

    Ekos: Lib 36.7% Con 30.2% Ndp 15.5% Bq 9.4% Grn 8.1% …

    its to put Harper into…..LOL

  • Observant

    Good points, terry1 … so the next election expected for this Fall will be a PR contest and a full-fledged mud-slinging match (a la Kinsella) … all for the hearts, minds and votes of Canadians.

    Who will Canadians prefer? The guy who reduced taxes versus the guy who says he wants to increase taxes? The guy who has fought the good fight against separatists and living in Canada, or the guy who was absent for 30 years living in the UK and USA? The guy who earned his PM position the hard way working in the trenches or the guy who just shows up to be PM all within 4 years of service to the country?

    Will the Liberal backroom strategists be able to demonize Harper so much that Ignatieff will start to look good to Canadians? Will the Conservatives be blamed for the global recession and deficits while the Liberals will be remembered for reducing the Mulroney deficits (downloading it all on to the provinces)? Will Liberal strategy be to link Mulroney to Harper based on the current inquiry all to stain Conservatives with corruption?

    Do current polling numbers reflect dissatisfaction with Harper and preference for Ignatieff or do they reflect party preferences … or do they only reflect the opinions of urbanites in Toronto and Montreal? Will Canadians give Ignatieff credit for traveling the world and thus fully 'competent' to govern Canada moreso than Canadian-bound Harper? Will Canadians recognize that Ignatieff's impressive academic record is superior to Harper's sparse academic status?

    Will Canadians vote Liberal in any next election thus rewarding Ignatieff with the prime ministership by default? So many questions that will only be answered in an election expected this Fall when Ignatieff declares that the 'probation' is over and Canada needs a Liberal government to save Canada just like Chretien and Martin saved Canada after fully discredited Mulroney?

    Get the drift …….????

  • Liberal Supporter

    I suppose the Tories are just letting the liberals surge ahead in support in order to lull them into a false sense of security. That Harper is a wiley character.

  • Liz J

    Terry, how do you like the performance of your expert economist John McCallum? He's been caught in a bit of a lie, an outright and pathetic one at that. No Conservative would survive that, the MSM would never let it die for starters and Conservatives are held to a much higher standard by their supporters.

    I'm not interested in polls, they're used and abused and meddle in the democratic process.

  • terry1

    Liz J…….his lie measured against Flaherty's multiple whoppers are small potatoes.

    As for polls you only like the ones that show your guy winning. You yourself quoted the polls to me many months ago in another blog. You can't have it both ways. Then again you are a Harper fan.

  • terry1

    Take dead aim………you sure know how to spell hypocrisy in a well thought out piece. Harper knows he's dead meat and is simply hanging on until the summer recess when he will probably announce his departure.

  • Liz J

    “His” lie, you mean McCallum's lie I presume, is yet another example of a systemic problem, going back, waaay back. We'll see how true patriot leader Ignatieff deals with this one.

    Flaherty's “multiple whoppers”? Gimme a break. In the present situation we expect changes to plan and policy to deal with the global recession. To Liberals, it's a puny definition of a lie but to anyone with the ability to reason it's common sense.

    Quoting polls and bragging about them as if they're the final word are two different things. Conservatives will not support a candidate who doesn't measure up, we tend to hold our choices to higher standards.

  • terry1

    If you held your choices to high standards Harper would never have made it.

    Polls are a sampling of the populations moods at a given time but they do reflect an ongoing pattern. In this case it is the descent of Harper to much lower party and personal numbers.

    Iggy will be campaigning and raising money for the foreseeable future all the while raising his profile and getting comfortable in his role as PM in waiting. Meanwhile the recession has not yet bottomed out so Iggy is in a patient mood.

  • Liz J

    Thanks for your informed and expert opinion concerning the recession.

    Harper's got much lower personal numbers? Must be those rose colored glasses playing tricks on you.

    Polls may or may not reflect an “ongoing pattern”. They can be very fickle, polls in Quebec are an example, they can turn on a dime.

    On the fund raising front, Garth Turner is launching a new book, proceeds to help the Liberal cause in some way no doubt. Garth always wants to be helpful to his party, whichever it is. So many books, so little time. You wouldn't need to read Iggy's recently released “True Patriot Love”, you know all about him.

    Writing books and launching them, trying to be a leader and getting up to speed in the world of politics and the country makes him a real multi-tasker. I'm sure you'll forgive him for putting his foot in his mouth frequently and doing flip-flops.

  • terry1

    Well as I said to your sister Gabby we'll have to wait and see won't we on what Harper does.
    Your denials of everything make it seem more real for me.
    Look at the EKOS poll in detail and look at Harper's personal approval rating vs Iggy's.

  • Paul O

    I've been looking around the Elections.ca website, and so far I've been unable to find the legally-required financial reports for the current Liberal Leadership contest.

    We can find the start and end dates for the contest, and the fact that two of the three candidates have withdrawn:
    http://www.elections.ca/content.asp?section=pol

    But I've been unable to find the corresponding financial contribution and expenditure documents. Does anyone have a link to them?

  • Omanator

    Just to add a comment, The Libs have already started to blame the Tories for the recession.

  • Omanator

    I need to comment on your Position B. The money will be shoveled again by the train load into Quebec, After all the Block and the Liberal seats demand that. Quebecers have played that Game for almost 30 years and it will continue until the Country breaks apart. It is my opinion that eventually Canada will break up. I may not live to see it, but my daughter and grand daughter will. The break will come from the West. Because the West is already p-d off.

  • Omanator

    Don't bet on it.

  • Omanator

    I would like to know as well. I would like in particular to see the contribution of his 1000 dollar a plate dinner.

  • Omanator

    Just may be they count on Canadians not to want a PM who takes his orders from his old Cronies in the USA.

  • Omanator

    I need to comment on your Position B. The money will be shoveled again by the train load into Quebec, After all the Block and the Liberal seats demand that. Quebecers have played that Game for almost 30 years and it will continue until the Country breaks apart. It is my opinion that eventually Canada will break up. I may not live to see it, but my daughter and grand daughter will. The break will come from the West. Because the West is already p-d off.

  • Omanator

    Don't bet on it.

  • Omanator

    I would like to know as well. I would like in particular to see the contribution of his 1000 dollar a plate dinner.

  • Omanator

    Just may be they count on Canadians not to want a PM who takes his orders from his old Cronies in the USA.