New Senators

Newfoundland and Labrador – Fabian Manning

Nova Scotia – Fred Dickson, Stephen Greene, Michael L. MacDonald

PEI – Mike Duffy

New Brunswick – Percy Mockler, John D. Wallace

Québec – Patrick Brazeau, Suzanne Fortin-Duplessis, Leo Housakos, Michel Rivard

Ontario – Nicole Eaton, Irving Gerstein

Saskatchewan – Pamela Wallin

British Columbia – Nancy Greene Raine, Yonah Martin, Richard Neufeld

Yukon – Hector Daniel Lang

UPDATE: Here is the backgrounder from the Prime Minister’s Office

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Backgrounder

LIST OF NEW SENATORS

Newfoundland and Labrador

Fabian Manning has dedicated his career to serving Newfoundlanders and Labradorians at all three levels of government.  A three term councilor in the town of St. Brides, Mr. Manning served as coordinator for the Cape Shore Area Development Association for three years.  Mr. Manning would go on to win three elections to the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly as the representative for Placentia – St. Mary’s.  Mr. Manning was subsequently elected as Member of Parliament in the federal constituency of Avalon in the 2006 Federal Election campaign.  Mr. Manning would go on to chair both the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans as well as the Conservative Government’s Atlantic caucus.

Nova Scotia

Fred Dickson, QC is both one of Nova Scotia’s most respected lawyers and one of Canada’s top legal experts on offshore resource development.  Mr. Dickson is counsel with the law firm of McInnes Cooper.   Mr. Dickson has advised the federal and provincial government’s on numerous resource and infrastructure projects, including serving as an advisor to the Government of Nova Scotia during the singing of the 1982 and 1985 Canada / Nova Scotia Offshore Oil and Gas Agreements.  Mr. Dickson remains active in these files as a Director of the Offshore / Onshore Technologies Association of Nova Scotia and Canadian Council for Public-Private Partnerships.

Stephen Greene has political and policy experience at both the federal and provincial levels.  Mr. Greene served as Chief of Staff in the Leader’s Office of the Reform Party of Canada from 1993 and 1996 during which he helped manage the opposition response to the national unity and fiscal issues of the day.  He went on to work as the Executive Director of the Insurance Brokers Association of Nova Scotia.  For the past two years he has served as Principal Secretary and Deputy Chief of Staff to Nova Scotia Premier Rodney MacDonald with wide responsibilities to help the Premier administer an effective government for all Nova Scotians.

Michael L. MacDonald is a Nova Scotia businessman who since 1988 has been the owner and President of Fleur de Lis Motel Ltd. Mr. MacDonald had previously served terms as executive assistant to two federal cabinet ministers and the premier of Nova Scotia.  A graduate of the University of King’s College and Dalhousie University, Mr. MacDonald has been an activist and volunteer with the federal and provincial Conservative parties since university, and is presently Vice-President of the Conservative Party of Canada and a two-term representative for Nova Scotia on the party’s national executive. A native of Louisbourg, Mr. MacDonald is a long-time resident of Dartmouth where he resides with his wife and two teenaged sons.

Prince Edward Island

Michael Duffy is one of Canada’s most well known and respected news personalities and the current host of CTV’s daily program, Mike Duffy Live.  Mr. Duffy joined CBC Radio News in 1974, switched to CBC TV’s “The National” in 1978, and joined CTV in 1988.  He is a member of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame.  Mr. Duffy is involved in a number of charitable activities both in Ottawa and in his home province, including the UPEI Building fund, and the current Holland College Foundation Fundraising campaign.  He has been a visiting fellow at Duke University; and has been twice nominated for the “Best in the Business” award by the Washington Journalism Review. Mr. Duffy has received many other awards and citations, and honourary degrees from the University of PEI; from Niagara University in Niagara Falls, NY; and from Wilfrid Laurier University in Brantford.

New Brunswick

Percy Mockler has been a long-time MLA in the New Brunswick legislature since he was first elected in 1982. During his time in the provincial legislature, Mr. Mockler served in a number of portfolio’s including Minister of Wellness, Culture and Sport, Solicitor General and Minister of Human Resources  Development and Housing. Mr. Mockler is a former advisory member for trade opportunities strategy with the federal Department of External Affairs. He has also been active in community affairs as treasurer of local fish and wildlife associations, a director of the caisse populaire, and as a member and chair of his local school board.

John D. Wallace was born in Rothesay, NB and had a distinguished law career in St. John.  Most recently, he served for 7 years as Partner/Counsel at the law firm of Stewart McKelvey.  Previously he had been Corporate Counsel for Irving Oil Limited and a Partner at Palmer, O’Connell, Leger, Turnbull and Turnbull.  Mr. Wallace continued his community service after retiring from law.  He is a Member of the University of New Brunswick Board of Governors, the St. John Imperial Theatre Capital Campaign Cabinet and the New Brunswick Symphony Steering Committee. Mr. Wallace was the Telegraph-Journal Male Newsmaker of the Year in 2002 and became a recipient of the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal in 2003.

Quebec

Patrick Brazeau is a member of the Algonquin Nation and a citizen of the Indian reserve of Kitigan Zibi, near Maniwaki, Quebec. A champion of the rights of Aboriginals, in 2006, he was chosen as the National Chief of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples. He used this forum to promote the economic and social development of Aboriginals, especially those who live off-reserve. Mr. Brazeau has a black belt in karate and was a member of the Naval Reserve on HMCS Carleton, in Ottawa.

Suzanne Fortin-Duplessis was born in Chicoutimi and studied at the École des Beaux-arts de Québec and at Laval University, where she obtained a bachelor’s degree in visual arts and a certificate in college education. She was a teacher at the regional school board Louis-Fréchette. In 1981, she became the first woman to be elected to the Municipal Council of the City of Sainte-Foy. She became active in federal politics and was elected as the MP for the riding of Louis-Hébert from 1984 to 1993. Ms. Fortin-Duplessis has always been involved in the community. During her career, she was a member of the board of the Alzheimer Society and the Fondation de l’Opéra de Québec, and she is a member of the Laval hospital and the Saint-Sacrement hospital foundations. More recently, she was a volunteer for the International Eucharistic Congress.

Leo Housakos was born in Montreal and studied at Cégep Vanier and at McGill University, where he obtained a bachelor’s degree in arts, with a major in political science and history. In 1993, he co-founded the Montreal Hellenic Chamber of Commerce and is currently a Director of Via Rail Canada.Throughout his business career he has held important management positions in several companies, including Quadvision Consultants and Terrau. Mr. Housakos is married and is the father of two children.

Michel Rivard studied in Quebec City and spent the most part of his professional life in public administration. He was President of the Corporation des maîtres entrepreneurs en réfrigération du Québec, then Mayor of Beauport from 1980 to 1984. Mr. Rivard was director of a number of organizations, and was President of the Executive Committee of the Communauté Urbaine de Québec. In 1994, he was elected at the Assemblée nationale as the MNA for Limoilou. He was Regional Delegate for the region of Quebec and parliamentary Assistant of the Minister responsible for the region of Quebec.

Ontario

Nicole Eaton has devoted much of her life to serving her community in varying degrees through her participation and leadership in a number of charitable organizations, foundations and the arts. Presently she is Director and Vice-Chair of St. Michael’s Hospital Foundation, Director and Vice-Chair the National Ballet of Canada and Chair of the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies. Previously, Ms Eaton has served in varying capacities on a number of other organizations, including the Royal Ontario Museum, the George R. Gardiner Museum, the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair and the Stratford Festival of Canada. Ms Eaton is also a columnist for the newspaper the National Post and is co-author of two publications.

Irving Gerstein, C.M., O. Ont is a businessman and corporate director.  A Member of both the Order of Canada the Order of Ontario, Mr. Gerstein has been involved in politics for over 40 years, including service as Chair of the Conservative Fund Canada. He is an Honorary Director of Mount Sinai Hospital (Toronto), having previously served as Chairman of the Board, Chairman Emeritus, and a director over a period of twenty-five years.   He is a director of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and a former Chairman of the Young Presidents Organization.   Mr. Gerstein graduated from the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce, University of Pennsylvania, and attended The London School of Economics.

Saskatchewan

Pamela Wallin, O.C., S.O.M is an award winning journalist whose career stretches back more than three decades.  Ms. Wallin is most recognized from her time at CTV where she co-hosted Canada AM and later served as CTV’s Ottawa Bureau chief.  Ms. Wallin would subsequently form her own production company Pamela Wallin Productions Inc.   Ms. Wallin has remained active in public life as Chancellor of the University of Guelph and Senior Advisor on Canada-US relations to the President of the Americas Society and the Council of the Americas.  In 2007, Prime Minister Harper appointed Ms. Wallin to the Independent Panel on Canada’s Future Role in Afghanistan. Ms. Wallin has agreed to step down as Senator and submit her name as a candidate when Saskatchewan holds its first legislated Senate election.

British Columbia

Nancy Greene Raine, O.C., OBC was Canada’s female athlete of the last century by the Canadian Press and Broadcast News.  She won gold and silver medals in alpine skiing at the 1968 Grenoble Olympics and overall World Cup titles in 1967 and 1968. Her total of 14 World Cup victories (including the Olympics) is still a Canadian record. During her nine-year career Nancy won a total of 17 Canadian Championship titles. Since retiring from active competition, she has worked to promote the sport and was instrumental in the early development of the Whistler-Blackcomb Resort.  Since 1994 she has been Director of Skiing at Sun Peaks Resort and since 2005 she has been Chancellor of Thompson Rivers University.  Ms. Green Raine is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a member of both Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and Canada’s Walk of Fame.
Yonah Martin has deep roots in both Korean and Canadian heritage and has spent her life building bridges between different cultural communities in BC.  Born in Seoul, South Korea, before immigrating to Canada 1972, Ms. Martin is the co-founder of the Corean Canadian Coactive (C3) society and has served on the Multicultural Advisory Council of BC, the Vancouver Korean Canadian Scholarship Foundation, the Kateslem After School Club and the Coquitlam Festival Planners Network.   Ms. Martin has also been active in political life as a candidate in the constituency of New Westminster-Coquitlam.  In 2004 Ms. Martin received ‘Spirit of Community’ award for her service in the Tri-Cities Area.

Richard Neufeld has spent close to two decades in public service to the people of British Columbia.  First elected to represent the riding of Peace River North in 1991, Mr. Neufeld has been re-elected on three separate occasions.  Since 2001 Mr. Neufeld has served as British Columbia’s Minister of Energy Mines and Petroleum Resources.  Mr. Neufeld has also served as the on the council of Fort Nelson, including five years as mayor.  Prior to his involvement in public life, Mr. Neufeld owned and operated his own business.

Yukon

Hector Daniel Lang has made the Yukon his home for more than 50 years.  Born in 1948 in Dawson Creek, BC, he moved with his family to Whitehorse where he completed high school, and later attended the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.  First elected to the Yukon Legislative Assembly in 1974, Mr Lang served 5 consecutive terms, retiring from the legislature in 1992.  Over the course of his 18 years in elected office he was responsible for numerous Ministerial portfolios and later served in the opposition.  Since 1992, Mr. Lang has worked as a Sales Associate in the Yukon Real Estate industry.  Active in community affairs, he is currently the Vice Chairman of the Board of Governors for Yukon College. He has four children and three grandchildren, who reside in Whitehorse. Mr Lang presently lives in Whitehorse with his partner Valerie Hodgson, a local artist.

Comments

comments

  • Ted

    And finally we have Harper's jobs-creation plan!

    Too bad about the rest of us Canadians. Wonder if he can find another promise to break for the rest of us.

  • tibi

    While Nicky Eaton and Irving Gerstein are decent choices, it's the kiss of death for John Tory. No Queen's Park vacancy for him to fill.

  • Bruce

    Well Ted, how's the old fund raising campaign going for the Liberal's?

    If it was not for the Liberal dominated Senate blocking attempted reforms there would not have been the need to do this.

    Hypocrisy thy name is Liberal.

  • Gerry from Toronto

    I am glad for Mike Duffy as he would make an excellent senator but will miss him as one of the few journalists in Ottawa that actually tried to be fair. They are few and far between in Ottawa as there are way too many so-called journalists who let their personal biases dictate the tone of their stories and they tend to be very pro-Liberal.

    Gerry from Toronto

  • Bob

    PORK!

    Did Harper not have a gme plan when he said he would never appoint senators? He's 57 moves ahead of everyone else.

    Harper will be pilloried not because he is a Conservative but because he swore for 20 years he would never do the very thing he is doing.

    What does he stand for?

  • http://hallsofmacadamia.blogspot.com/ neo

    *
    yeah sure, ted… you're a genius.

    the prime minister should have waited for the “dion quintuplets… sorry, the triplets” to try out their non-confidence coup so THEY could fill the senate seats.

    i'm sure emperor gilles the first would have had some interesting picks.

    *

  • anon

    so will duffy sit as a conservative then? what happens to his show?

  • simon

    Gheez Bob
    Are you one of those who holds your spouse responsible for your impotence?
    Wake up and look at the facts…objectively…
    Then go complain to your LPC MP about their lack of commitment to fair and equal representation in the Senate.

  • bec

    Bob, your statement is exactly the same on the other post.

    Has the PM every said, “I will NEVER appoint senators”? I have never seen a direct quote from him that suggests that he has made that statement.

    I think it is great. The Senate needs some new blood and requires faster action for committee work etc.

    I suspect that no one is more disappointed than the PM and by looking at the list, certainly no favors for partisan cronies.
    This is an interesting group.

  • MaryT

    Alberta has no vacancies at the present time. The next one might be when Joyce Fairburn has to retire.
    So, albertans don't get upset, unless a lib senator from Alberta dies, there are no openings.

  • MaryT

    I wish someone had a camera on a few faces when these announcements were made, with Oliver, Fife, Lloyd and Newman in the lens. Any ambulances called to ctv to handle stroke and heart attacks.
    Duffy must have known for days this was coming but kept a secret.
    Who will take over his show, and if some of those mentioned do it, watch for it to take a huge dive in ratings.

  • Gabby in QC

    Maybe you should keep up to date with the news:

    http://www.cbc.ca/canada/edmonton/story/2007/04
    “Harper appoints Albertan senator-in-waiting
    Last Updated: Wednesday, April 18, 2007 | 3:19 PM MT
    CBC News

    Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Wednesday that he is appointing Alberta's “senator in waiting,” Bert Brown, as the first elected senator in nearly 20 years.

    Harper told the House of Commons on Wednesday that he would name Brown to the upper chamber.

    Brown, a longtime champion of Senate reform, took the most votes in Alberta's third Senate election in 2004. …”

    Notice the date of the report: April 18, 2007.

    Furthermore, there were no seats open for Alberta this time around, OK, Bob? Here, read up on the composition breakdown (From Wiki):
    “Seats are assigned on a regional basis, with each of the four major regions receiving 24 seats, and the remainder of the available seats being assigned to smaller regions. The four major regions are: Ontario, Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and the Western provinces.”

  • Pierre Pharand

    Thanks for posting this Stephen. I can't wait to see if things change now that the Senate is a little more balanced.

  • Pat

    The P.M. has already appointed an Alberta “Senator in Waiting”. Alberta's allotment is full until another one retires. He could't appoint anyone else from there

  • js

    bob, Alberta did not “get” a Senator today because there were no open seats in Alberta, while there were vacancies in the other provinces….it's not all a giant anti-Alberta conspiracy.

  • Ted

    Unbelievable.

    Harper appoints a separatist to the Senate of Canada and doesn't even have the courage to tell Canadians in his own backgrounder.

    Meet Senator Michel Rivard, former MLA and cabinet minister for the Parti Quebecois:

    “Élu député du Parti québécois dans Limoilou en 1994. Délégué régional de la région de Québec du 26 septembre 1994 au 29 janvier 1996, et adjoint parlementaire du ministre responsable de la région de Québec du 29 janvier 1996 au 28 octobre 1998. Défait en 1998. “

  • Leigh

    How appropriate that the lib. shills are crying about a PM who, when forced appointed folks to the Senate, as an elected government, and NOT because they're toadies of an unelected coalition.

    Let the conspiracies begin…..because it's what the opposition does best……after all they've got nothing else.

  • Bruce

    Still nothing coming into the Liberal coffers, eh Ted?

  • PrairieDog

    Ted, I think that the PM would have preferred to have elected Senators. It is hard to keep a promise when the people who are saying that he should keep his promise, are the very people stopping him from keeping that promise. Following? The hypocrisy of the Liberal/left-wing hacks is so obvious, it's become “normal”. I would also like to add that there are a few Liberal Senators that actually want this so the Senate can function properly. To leave the Senate open for the Liberals to fill would in effect make Canada a joke of a democracy. A senate filled with all Liberals (appointed) is hardly fair representation. That is just simple logic.

  • donald

    So much for caucus confidentiality. Duff will soon have enuff for his expose-eh.

  • PrairieDog

    My guess is Graham Richardson. He seems to be a good candidate to take over for Mike's time slot.

  • Gabby in QC

    Eureka! I found it!

    Those who are arguing the PM decided to “stack” the Senate as a preemptive strike in case the coalition brings down the government … read on:
    http://www.thestar.com/News/Canada/article/517893
    Harper to tackle economy
    Oct 15, 2008 03:02 PM

    Tonda MacCharles
    Richard Brennan
    Ottawa Bureau

    “… He [the PM] said he will try to find “common ground” with the opposition parties to work on economic issues, but Harper noted he heard little in the way of alternatives during the campaign, just a lot of criticism of the government.

    He said he would keep his “parliamentary options” open when it comes to confidence votes this fall to move his agenda forward, and ***if need be, appoint unelected members to the Senate to make sure legislation is not stalled.*** …”

    Also, this:
    http://tinyurl.com/9dbcvk
    The Hill Times, October 20th, 2008

    Parliament likely to start in mid-November
    Conservatives to attend policy convention Nov. 13-15, Parliament to open for legislative business shortly after.
    By Abbas Rana and Harris MacLeod

    “… ***Mr. Harper also discussed Senate reform at the press conference, saying that though his party's position is that Senators be elected, if that is not possible he will make appointments to the Liberal-dominated Senate.***
    “I do not believe it is justified that the Senate would continue to be dominated by a party that did not win two consecutive elections,” he said. …”

  • bec

    Ted,

    So what?

    Furthermore as the opinions about the PM are just that, opinions; could this be a respectful olive branch?
    The guy has been on both sides of the fence. He may have some clarity that should be acknowledged.

    When was the last time any bouquet of senate appointments created this amount of dissection? Mission accomplished, IMHO

    http://blog.macleans.ca/2008/12/22/senatewatch-

  • Lee

    “What does he stand for”
    Well, Bob, try common sense.
    When you have a coalition who are obviously not wanted by the majority of Canadians, but who would in any event fill the Senate vacancies (as a pay off) By bodies that are not palatable to the Canadian public, I dont see that the Prime Minister had a choice.
    Why did the Liberals give up on the Green Shift, Bob?

  • Lee

    “What does he stand for”
    Well, Bob, try common sense.
    When you have a coalition who are obviously not wanted by the majority of Canadians, but who would in any event fill the Senate vacancies (as a pay off) By bodies that are not palatable to the Canadian public, I dont see that the Prime Minister had a choice.
    Why did the Liberals give up on the Green Shift, Bob?

  • Gabby in QC

    You want job creation? Take a look at THIS list (from Wiki):
    Jean Chrétien 1993.11.04 – 2003.12.11

    Liberal = 72

    Independent = 3

    Total = 75

    Pro-Government senators appointed – 72 – 96.0%

    Opposition senators appointed – 0 – 0.0%

    Non-Partisan senators appointed – 3 – 4.0%

    Paul Martin 2003.12.12 – 2006.02.06

    Liberal = 12

    Conservative = 2

    Progressive Conservative = 2

    New Democratic Party = 1 (Not recognized as a New Democratic Party senator by the New Democratic Party)
Total = 17

    Pro-Government senators appointed – 12 – 70.6%

    Opposition senators appointed – 5 – 29.4%

    Non-Partisan senators appointed – 0 – 0.0%

    And these complaints from The Hill Times:
    http://www.hilltimes.com/html/index.php?full_path=2008/may/12/legislation/&display=story

    The Hill Times, May 12th, 2008

    “Senator urges Prime Minister Harper to fill increasing Senate vacancies

    Currently, there are 14 Senate vacancies, but there will be 30 vacancies by the end of 2009. …


    … [Liberal] Sen. Moore pointed to his home province of Nova Scotia, where there are currently three vacancies.
“We are entitled to those vacancies being filled,” he said. “You can appoint Progressive Conservatives, Conservatives, Reformers, or whomever you like. …

    Liberal democratic reform critic and MP Brian Murphy (Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe, N.B.) said the government is not following the law by refusing to appoint Senators and is doing “a disservice” to provinces with vacancies.”

    Get it? LIBERALS were asking in May of this year to fill those vacancies because committee work was getting difficult to do, and keeping them vacant was a “disservice” to provinces.
    Now that the PM has acceded to those requests, there’s a hue and cry.

    So whose tune has changed?
    BTW, Stephen, the Conservative.ca website should archive all the PM’s pressers.
    Why?
    Because I’m pretty sure in the presser after the Oct. 14 election, the PM hinted that he might have to fill the vacancies after all, since his senate reform had been blocked thus far.
    Unfortunately I have been unable to dig up a link to prove my memory right.

  • Gabby in QC

    You want job creation? Take a look at THIS list (from Wiki):
    Jean Chrétien 1993.11.04 – 2003.12.11

    Liberal = 72

    Independent = 3

    Total = 75

    Pro-Government senators appointed – 72 – 96.0%

    Opposition senators appointed – 0 – 0.0%

    Non-Partisan senators appointed – 3 – 4.0%

    Paul Martin 2003.12.12 – 2006.02.06

    Liberal = 12

    Conservative = 2

    Progressive Conservative = 2

    New Democratic Party = 1 (Not recognized as a New Democratic Party senator by the New Democratic Party)
Total = 17

    Pro-Government senators appointed – 12 – 70.6%

    Opposition senators appointed – 5 – 29.4%

    Non-Partisan senators appointed – 0 – 0.0%

    And these complaints from The Hill Times:
    http://www.hilltimes.com/html/index.php?full_path=2008/may/12/legislation/&display=story

    The Hill Times, May 12th, 2008

    “Senator urges Prime Minister Harper to fill increasing Senate vacancies

    Currently, there are 14 Senate vacancies, but there will be 30 vacancies by the end of 2009. …


    … [Liberal] Sen. Moore pointed to his home province of Nova Scotia, where there are currently three vacancies.
“We are entitled to those vacancies being filled,” he said. “You can appoint Progressive Conservatives, Conservatives, Reformers, or whomever you like. …

    Liberal democratic reform critic and MP Brian Murphy (Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe, N.B.) said the government is not following the law by refusing to appoint Senators and is doing “a disservice” to provinces with vacancies.”

    Get it? LIBERALS were asking in May of this year to fill those vacancies because committee work was getting difficult to do, and keeping them vacant was a “disservice” to provinces.
    Now that the PM has acceded to those requests, there’s a hue and cry.

    So whose tune has changed?
    BTW, Stephen, the Conservative.ca website should archive all the PM’s pressers.
    Why?
    Because I’m pretty sure in the presser after the Oct. 14 election, the PM hinted that he might have to fill the vacancies after all, since his senate reform had been blocked thus far.
    Unfortunately I have been unable to dig up a link to prove my memory right.

  • bob

    So… Alberta, who has had elected senators in waiting for the last several years gets shut out again while friggin Quebec gets the lion’s share. Typical. Where do I sign up for the Alberta separation party? I’m sick of the bullshit already.

  • bob

    So… Alberta, who has had elected senators in waiting for the last several years gets shut out again while friggin Quebec gets the lion’s share. Typical. Where do I sign up for the Alberta separation party? I’m sick of the bullshit already.

  • William

    bob where have you been???? another planet. Alberta has an elected senator. Sask will elect one in 2009.
    Just remember one step at time.

  • Gabby in QC

    Ted, here are two Liberal icons' previous affiliations:

    http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTV
    “Trudeau biography sheds light on separatist youth
    Updated Thu. Jun. 1 2006 9:48 AM ET
    CTV.ca News Staff

    An explosive biography on former prime minister Pierre Trudeau paints an image of the iconic leader that is sharply at odds with the popular mythology surrounding his legacy.
    The book, Young Trudeau: Son of Quebec, Father of Canada, 1919-1944, reveals that Trudeau was a fascist sympathizer who shared the anti-Semitic sentiments of the day, promoted revolution, and sought an independent and Catholic Quebec that would be home only to French Canadians. …”

    http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cf
    “… He [Stephane Dion] began the first leg of his own political journey by naming his pet turtle Trotsky – and teaching his parrot to repeat i-dé-o-lo-gie – while dabbling in doctrinaire Marxist babble as a long-haired freshman at the Jesuit priests' elite Collège Saint-Charles-Garnier in Quebec City. But, the better to annoy his old man, he soon evolved into a left-wing separatist, knocking on bourgeois doors on behalf of future PQ cabinet minister Louise Beaudoin in the 1976 election. “He thought René Lévesque was a moderate,” boyhood chum Robert MacKay remembers. …”

    Oops! the latter no longer so iconic. Maybe dysgonic?

    In any event, I'm surprised and disappointed a “progressive” doesn't accept that people can change their POVs. In some circles it's called rehabilitation, even redemption.

  • Gabby in QC

    Thanks for the info, Wilson.

    Now, maybe Margot McDiarmid at CBC should be apprised of the facts. She keeps repeating on Newsworld that Stephen Harper has appointed the biggest number of senators in Canadian history (must check that one out) and for the reason previously stated – to preempt a spate of possible coalition appointments.

  • wilson

    You’re right Gabby, right after the election:
    ”Reform Senate or we’ll appoint Conservatives, Harper warns”
    October 15, 2008

    http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/posted/archive/2008/10/15/reform-senate-or-we-ll-appoint-conservatives-harper-warns.aspx

    Can’t reform the Senate from the outside, reform it from the inside!

  • wilson

    You’re right Gabby, right after the election:
    ”Reform Senate or we’ll appoint Conservatives, Harper warns”
    October 15, 2008

    http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/posted/archive/2008/10/15/reform-senate-or-we-ll-appoint-conservatives-harper-warns.aspx

    Can’t reform the Senate from the outside, reform it from the inside!

  • http://www.stephentaylor.ca Stephen Taylor

    Still no majority

  • http://www.stephentaylor.ca Stephen Taylor

    Still no majority

  • Rob

    I have a feeling Craig Oliver had a fit. He'd be a shoe in if Dion had formed a govenment.

  • Rob

    Graham Richardson would be a good choice. I'd stop watching if Giggles Taber took over.

  • Anonymous

    Shame Tasha wasn’t on the list.
    Maybe next time.
    Or perhaps she privately declined.

  • Anonymous

    Shame Tasha wasn’t on the list.
    Maybe next time.
    Or perhaps she privately declined.

  • http://maxwell-devin.blogspot.com Devin Maxwell

    Gabby:

    I think you'd agree there is a slight difference between sitting as an MNA and supporting a political party as a teenager…

    Don't forget that Stephen Harper was a member of the Young Liberals in high school.

  • Anonymous

    Try doing the right thing under very unfair circumstances.
    It’s people on your side of the aisle that opposed senate reform and it’s not one vacancy but 17 or 18. PMSH had to act, period.

  • Anonymous

    Try doing the right thing under very unfair circumstances.
    It’s people on your side of the aisle that opposed senate reform and it’s not one vacancy but 17 or 18. PMSH had to act, period.

  • http://dailyrantsblog.com dailyrantsblog.com

    It's official . All the political parties are the same.

  • Gabby in QC

    “Stephen Harper was a member of the Young Liberals in high school.”
    True, and was soon disappointed by them. That's why he left.

    Devin, you apparently didn't get my main point: people CAN change their mind, and consequently, party affiliations. Or is that permissible only when NDPers and Liberals do it?

    As for Trudeau and his “youthful escapades,” I believe he was in his early twenties. As stated in the CTV article I referenced above:
    «In 1942, Trudeau was still promoting the idea of an independent Quebec for francophones, when he joined a “secret” group, which published a manifesto calling for a national revolution. …
    Trudeau also went on to denounce the Canadian government for declaring war on Germany in 1939.»
    Born in 1919, Trudeau was 23 in 1942. Not exactly a teenager.

    “If a man is not a socialist in his youth, he has no heart. If he is not a conservative by the time he is 30 he has no head” — attributed to both Winston Churchill and Georges Clemenceau, among others.

  • Alberta Girl

    Bob – I am from Alberta – are you?? Because if you are, you should know that we are the only province to have had elected senators in waiting and Bert Brown was appointed by Harper. I believe that Stan Waters was also appointed in 1990 by Mulroney – he was the first elected senator.

    As has been pointed out – there are no seats this time; so stop with the Alberta gets shafted again.

  • J the M

    Looking at the list of picks there is what ot be expected, which is a strong group of Conservative partisans. To a degree this needed to be done to make senate committees work. The pick I find most concerning is for BC, that being Richard Nuefeld. Although a member of the BC Liberals he is definitely consevative and more. Having dealt with him personally in his function as Minister of Energy and Mines for the province of BC, he does not work or play well with others. He is at best obstructionist, when things don't go exactly as he wishes them too. Even strong supporters of the soon to be minted Senator Nuefeld would likely agree with that sentiment. He acts more like a gangster than a public servant at most times.
    I wonder if he is the “plant” by Harper to make the senate dysfuntional. Harper could also be continuing his strategizing to force the election he wants asap. This pick signals something but I guess we will have to wait and see, something definitely smells a little off. Oh well it should come as no surprise to anyone who watches Canadian politics, that Harper would put petty political manovering ahead of proper governance. He will likely raise the ire of the opposition in the HOC and the majority in the Senate. The question that is raised is will it blow-up in his face again, or has he refined his tactics to acheive what ever his objective may be.

  • http://daemon-ink.net she

    ARGH! It's Saint John, not St. John. Can't believe the lack of attention to detail. Or perhaps it shouldn't come as a surprise coming from the PMO.

  • ken

    Hi all,

    This is just my quick injection of lib'rul vitriol before Christmas. Are we all seated comfortably?OK. Let's begin…

    I think there were some quite good appointments made for Senate. Also, this librul isn't afraid of an elected Senate, but maybe it's just me. (didn't see that coming, didja?)

    Anyway, my real intent here is first to say that Mr Harper seems to be taking better advice, and I am a bit more confident now that he's governing responsibly. Say what you want about the threat of a “Coalition”, but I think it was a necessary wake-up call.

    Second, I would like to wish all Canadians, even crusty Conservatives, a Merry and joyeux Christmas/Noel/Hannukah/Kwaanza/Festivus. It would be nice if you hardliners would pause and consider that the other side also happens to love this country too. Also, as you can plainly see south of the border, foaming-at-the-mouth vilification of the other side has gone out of fashion for the moment, and bi-partisanship is teh hawt now.

    My New Years' wish is that PMSH gets a new muzzle and leash for Flaherty and the other Ontario Tory castoffs. They did Ontario little good, and as we've already seen, they haven't changed. Watch out Mr PM, they'll drag ya down.

    Best wishes all!

  • batb

    Despite all of the politics, tis the Season to be jolly, and to wish Stephen and everyone who comments here a Blessed and Joyful Christmas! God bless us, every one!